MBRN – Welcome

The Muslims in Britain Research Network (MBRN) was established to encourage and promote the study of Muslims and Islam in Britain. It brings together academics, students, professionals, researchers, journalists and practitioners.

Connect with the MBRN’s mailing list:
The MBRN mailing list exists so that members may share their recent research and activities, ask questions about research issues, put ideas forward for evaluation, and participate in discussions.

To join the mailing list, please visit the MBRN Yahoo Group page and click on the Join This Group! button. Please make sure to include a short statement about yourself in order to establish eligibility to join the Network.

Connect with the MBRN on social media:
Keep up to date with news, links, event announcements and more through the
MBRN Twitter Account
MBRN Facebook Group
MBRN Facebook Page

Registration is open now for our next event, ‘The Future of British Muslim Studies’, 24th April, Cardiff University

Since the Muslims in Britain Research Network was established over 25 years ago, British Muslim studies has grown exponentially. Yet despite this, the field faces significant challenges and uncertainty about its future direction. With so much of the focus on British Muslims being driven – both in academia and in wider society – by instrumental concerns about security and terrorism, much needed debates about the field’s core goals and purpose have often been obscured. The near constant use of research reports and polls on British Muslims in service of political agendas has meant that not only do those researching British Muslims often struggle to get their voices heard, but they are also forced to face difficult questions about their positioning and politics.

This one day event will bring together those from within and outside of academia who have an interest in shaping the study of Muslim Britain in order to discuss and debate the challenges facing the field and where it should go from here. What should British Muslim studies do, and who should it be for? Should it be seen as part of a project of improving Muslims’ rights and representation, as with the case of comparable fields like Black Studies, or remain at a critical distance from Muslim politics? Is the field itself sufficiently inclusive of the diversity of Muslim and non-Muslim voices, and is sufficient recognition given to those outside the academy producing research into Muslims? When, and how, should academics partner with Muslim and community and activist groups? With researchers in the field scattered across disciplines, and with religion increasingly marginalised in the academy, how can the field cohere and have a positive impact?

Full programme details and registration here.